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An article published in JAMA Internal Medicine poses the question, does the addition of behavior-change text messages improve the lives—and pain and functioning—of those with osteoarthritis in their knees. The simple answer appears to be "yes," at least for the 206 adults in the trial, all of whom...

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The Hospital for Special Surgery warns that, along with warmer weather comes runners, and foot problems. Overuse injuries, repetitive stress, stress fractures. There’s a lot to potentially damage: the foot is made up of 33 joints, 26 small bones, and more than 100 ligaments, muscles, and tendons...

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Insurance companies would be more likely to pay for nontraditional approaches to pain management if they knew these methods worked. Jon Porter, medical director of the University of Vermont Medical Center Comprehensive Pain Program, and researchers compiled qualitative data from people who...

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VAntage Point, the official blog of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, discusses the importance of neuroscience education and physical therapy for older Veterans. VA Geriatric Scholar Ralph Magnuson commented that through a group physical therapy program, “We saw a significant change as a...

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Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is always in the news (read last week's Daily Dose about CLBP and serum biomarkers). Exercise is recommended for CLBP, but what kind of exercise? An article in JAMA Neurology reports a study of various types of exercise and their long-term benefits. In a perfect world,...

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Exercise is often recommended by doctors for patients with low back pain (LBP), the leading cause of disability worldwide. Acute LBP frequently becomes chronic. Many interventions to manage chronic LBP "have modest benefits for improving outcomes." A article published in the journal of Musculoskelet...

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Objective: To examine the effect of adding aerobic exercise (AE) to neck-specific exercise treatment for patients with neck pain (NP) to reduce pain and disability.

Design: A prospective multicentre randomized controlled trial.

Setting: Physiotherapy outpatient clinics.

Subjects...

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Cancer chemotherapy side effects, like fatigue, pain and nausea, are typically intense immediately following an infusion and gradually subside until the next treatment two to three weeks later. Although exercise can lessen the side effects, the side effects often cause patients to avoid exercise. As...

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Newswise — It's well known that exercise is good for preventing and treating many forms of heart disease, but less commonly known are the benefits of physical activity for people living with and beyond cancer.

A new initiative called Moving Through Cancer -- led by Kathryn Schmitz, professor of...

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Newswise — High-intensity cycling is less painful when combined with virtual reality, according to a new study by University of Georgia researchers.

High-intensity interval training is a popular workout that often results in faster fitness and health gains than other types of exercise. However...

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