Registration Info

This is a 2-day meeting and will provide 12 CE/CME credits.

Conference Registration Fee

Practicing Healthcare Professionals: $199

Register now >>

Non-Clinicians / Medical Office Support Staff / Industry Participants

Non-clinicians—including, but not limited to, office managers, billing specialists, receptionists, and administrative staff—may attend PAINWeekEnd on a space-available basis when accompanied by a clinician and will be put on a wait list. These non-clinicians must still pre-register. Participation in industry sponsored meal programs, however, is strictly limited to practicing licensed healthcare providers. Please make necessary arrangements for meals for office support staff. In order to maintain the professional nature of the conference, guests, spouses, friends, and/or family members who are not currently employed in the medical field may not attend PAINWeekEnd.

Venue

Unfortunately, we do not have discounts available on hotel rooms. Please contact the hotel directly should you require accommodations.

Hyatt Regency Orange County
11999 Harbor Blvd
Garden Grove, CA 92840

View hotel website >>

Directions

Get Directions using Google Maps

Schedule

Faculty and courses are subject to change. Please refer to the online schedule below for the most recent course descriptions.

To view the schedule below, click on the + sign next to the day of the conference to expand the conference agenda. Click on the + signs within the agenda to view the course description, UAN number, and AANP pharmacology credits.

*not certified for credit

Saturday, April 6, 2019

  • REGISTRATION AND EXHIBITS

    Coffee will be served.

  • Involuntary Tapers: Legal, Ethical, and Clinical Concerns

    On March 15, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released their guideline with recommendations for primary care clinicians who prescribe opioids for chronic pain outside of active cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care. Although most of the recommendations were supported by weak or very weak evidence, Recommendation # 7 stated that “clinicians should optimize other therapies and work with patients to taper opioids to lower dosages or to taper and discontinue opioids” if the harms outweigh the benefits. At least a year after the release of the CDC guideline, several states have implemented dosage triggers, ceilings, and involuntary tapers, and some healthcare professionals have reportedly subjected their patients to involuntary tapers because they believed the CDC guideline required it. Consequently, this session will explore the ethical, legal, and clinical concerns and potential harms associated with the involuntary tapering of patients on long-term opioid therapy as a result of a state law, regulation, or out of fear of regulatory sanction by the healthcare provider.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-010-L01-P
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.00
  • PRODUCT, DISEASE AWARENESS, MEDICAL INFORMATION PROGRAM*

    Breakfast will be served.

  • Break & Exhibits

  • The Regulatory Agency Will See You Now

    Despite high prevalence and seemingly continuous attention, the clinical challenges associated with assessing, treating, and managing patients with chronic pain continue to persist. Many different forces are at play and responsible for this frequently frustrating situation and, as is often the case, the person with the most at risk is the patient with chronic pain. There is no deficit of opinions for possible solutions to this problem. In fact, the number of potential solutions seems to increase each year, all with the intent of helping pain care be more safe and effective, and most trying to stem the negative consequences of abuse, misuse, and diversion of prescription pain medications. Clinicians have had to juggle these good intentions along with the fear of regulatory scrutiny. This course will present and detail the variety of current regulatory forces that need to be considered in clinical practice; how they can potentially impact clinical decisions regarding chronic pain; and how they can be negotiated. A number of regulatory agencies are now “sitting at the pain management table” for the foreseeable future and it is critical to navigate the waters without sacrificing that most important stakeholder: the patient.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-014-L01-P
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.40
  • Embrace Changes and Prevent Overdose: A Basic Blueprint for Legal Risk Mitigation and Response

    Through the lens of medical expert testimony and case examples, attendees will learn core areas of risk mitigation with a focus on making electronic medical records and paper charting work for the practitioner to demonstrate prescribing in the usual course of professional practice. Overdose—a small word that packs a major punch, and a big reason for recent legal-regulatory changes in controlled substance prescribing and medication assisted treatment (MAT). Too often, prescribers are caught unprepared to respond to licensing board and legal inquiries surrounding overdose events. Many prescribers haven’t examined their own risk mitigation and documentation processes following changes to prescribing guidelines and rules, or even after learning about a patient’s emergency room visit or demise. Many prescribers also lack a structured approach to patient education to mitigate the risks associated with the use of controlled substances, errantly relying solely on a piece of paper to capture what should be a process of informed consent. Professional licensing board and criminal cases involving overdose events do not usually end well for the unprepared prescriber. Yet, there is much the prescriber can do proactively to signal his/her intent to prescribe for a legitimate medical purpose while acting in the usual course of professional practice and taking “reasonable steps” to mitigate abuse and diversion of controlled medication. This educational program includes lessons learned by the speaker through more than a decade of chart audits and legal case work. Attendees will have access to one or two sample templates that can be used to improve daily charting and to demonstrate adherence to risk evaluation, monitoring, and common documentation requirements. While prescribers cannot control what their patients do once they leave the medical office, they are responsible for establishing a safe framework for opioid prescribing, including a proper response when something goes wrong. This lecture will help the prescriber demonstrate thoughtful prescribing in the “usual course of professional practice” and improve the prescriber’s chances of minimizing legal liability associated with patient overdose.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-008-L01-P
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.00
  • Faculty Q&A

  • Break & Exhibits

  • PRODUCT, DISEASE AWARENESS, MEDICAL INFORMATION PROGRAM*

    Lunch will be served.

  • Cannabis vs Cannabinoids: The Politics of Medical Marijuana

    The subject of the medical use of cannabinoids has become an extremely hot topic. Unfortunately, there has been a tendency to equate medical cannabinoids with another very contentious topic: Medical Marijuana. In this presentation, the distinction between medical cannabinoids and medical cannabis will be explored. Specifically, the challenges facing prescribers who are being asked to prescribe medical marijuana will be examined.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-007-L01-P
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.00
  • Break & Exhibits

  • PRODUCT, DISEASE AWARENESS, MEDICAL INFORMATION PROGRAM*

    Refreshments will be served.

  • The Other Opioid Crisis: Heroin and Fentanyl

    There is a significant amount of media, political, and public attention paid to the opioid crisis/opioid epidemic in the United States today. With the seemingly ever-increasing number of opioid-related overdoses and fatalities, there has been a feverish push by stakeholders to diminish the amount of opioids prescribed in order to help stem these worrisome trends. Unfortunately, there may be a lack of focus regarding the true definition and characterization of the opioid epidemic. There may also be a rush to judgment about the role of appropriately prescribed opioid analgesics in the addiction crisis we face today as well. This presentation will discuss the roles and statistics of both prescription and illicit opioids (namely heroin and fentanyl) in today’s “opioid overdose epidemic” with the intention of clarifying important differences and similarities between these competing epidemics including concerns and clinical considerations specific to each of them. Additionally, this program will examine and identify how these medications and drugs share potentially tragic adverse effect profiles in many cases. However, it is important for clinicians to make sure that appropriate chronic pain patients that may be candidates for opioid analgesic therapy aren’t penalized, and still get the treatment that they deserve.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-013-L01-P
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.00
  • Get Your Specimens in Order: Timely Use of Test Results

    2018 was not a good year to be on the wrong side of medical necessity when it came to drug testing and ongoing prescribing of controlled medication or substance abuse treatment programs. 2019 is likely to be an expensive year for those who do not proactively take steps to understand medical necessity for drug testing, prescribing controlled medication, and ongoing substance abuse treatment, as payers continue to carefully scrutinize these areas. Using a series of case hypotheticals, attendees will learn how to identify the elements of medical necessity, efficiently and effectively document medical necessity for drug testing and use of drug test results in the ongoing care of the patient, and locate and use payer medical policies and coverage determinations. Attendees will be given 3 tools to reinforce learning objectives: a checklist for medical necessity documentation, sample summaries of payer medical policies, and templates for documenting use of drug test results and tailoring ongoing treatment decisions to the individual patient.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-009-L01-P
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.00

Sunday, April 7, 2019

  • REGISTRATION AND EXHIBITS

    Coffee will be served.

  • Policies and Practicalities: Focusing on the Patient, Not the Opioid

    The current opioid epidemic has resulted in numerous professional and society guidelines focused on safe opioid prescribing. In addition, policymakers have focused on state legislation to limit the duration of opioid prescribing for acute pain. As a result of the increased scrutiny, prescribers have shifted their focus to limiting opioid prescribing for patients with chronic noncancer pain. Now, more than ever, evidence based behavioral treatment modalities are essential for fostering pain coping skills and providing support as part of optimal interdisciplinary pain management. This course will begin with a brief review of the opioid epidemic. Current opioid prescribing guidelines will be discussed with a particular emphasis on indications for opioid tapering. Strategies for the medical management of opioid tapering will be presented, along with a detailed discussion of evidence based psychotherapeutic interventions known to result in improvements in physical and emotional functioning while promoting opioid tapering.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-037-L01-P
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.50
  • PRODUCT, DISEASE AWARENESS, MEDICAL INFORMATION PROGRAM*

    Breakfast will be served.

  • Break & Exhibits

  • The Psychology Toolbox: Evidence Based Treatments for Pain Management

    The opioid epidemic has caused many patients, clinicians, and payers to seek nonpharmacologic options to assist with managing pain. Psychology has a well-established role in the treatment of pain conditions but familiarity with the range of pain related interventions varies widely among clinicians. The Psychology Toolbox seeks to fill the knowledge gap by briefly explaining the role of psychology in pain treatment and reviewing a range of evidence based interventions to assist this burgeoning clinical population. Although cognitive behavioral therapy based interventions are the most frequently studied and applied paradigms, a number of other treatments also have demonstrated efficacy in pain care, but are lesser known. Thus, cognitive behavioral therapy for pain will be discussed, followed by an overview of several other pain treatment modalities: biofeedback training, mindfulness based stress reduction, and acceptance and commitment therapy. At the conclusion of the session, participants should possess a greater awareness of the vast array of evidence based treatments that can be used to help this group of individuals.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-038-L01-
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.00
  • No Guts No Glory: Mystery of the Microbiome

    In the age of modern medicine, it is easy to forget that we change our body chemistry every time we eat. The quality and composition of our food has the power to increase or decrease body wide inflammation and modulate pain. Our relationship to food and the way we eat is also cultural and influenced by stress and our environment.  The research evidence is robust for dietary interventions and improved health. The changes needed are simple, but not necessarily easy.  This lecture will focus on the role that modulation of the microbiome plays in pain, and ways to optimize the health of the individuals’ gut microbes for pain management and overall wellbeing.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-036-L01-
    • AANP Rx Hours: Coming soon.
  • Faculty Q&

  • Break & Exhibits

  • PRODUCT, DISEASE AWARENESS, MEDICAL INFORMATION PROGRAM*

    Lunch will be served.

  • Minimizing Pills and Maximizing Skills: Achieving Successful Opioid Cessation in Chronic Pain

    Per the department of Health and Human Services, opioid related overdose deaths have increased almost 400% over the last 18 years. This shift has yielded heightened scrutiny of prescribing practices, and opioids have subsequently fallen out of favor as a first-line treatment for chronic pain. In this changing landscape of pain care, it is more important than ever for clinicians to identify treatment pathways that will maximize patient outcomes while minimizing medication load. This presentation will review current literature related to use of opioids and medical challenges associated with weaning individuals off this class of drug. The role of evidence based behavioral treatment modalities known to result in improvement in physical and emotional functioning will be discussed in detail, including their use in the context of opioid weaning. The terms dependence, abuse, tolerance, and addiction are often used interchangeably when discussing opioid medication; however, use of nomenclature in this fashion is erroneous. The differences between these words will be explained and the implications for treatment discussed. Clinical pathways that often lead to medication escalation will be identified. The role of behavioral interventions for pain treatment and the literature supporting their use will be reviewed, including data from an interdisciplinary clinical program which provides patients such education while concurrently reducing opioid medication.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-035-L01-P
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.10
  • Break & Exhibits

  • Burnout! Recognize Symptoms, Enhance Resilience, and Improve Quality of Life

    Burnout, a phenomenon closely linked with depression and characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced self-efficacy, has increased at a disproportionate rate in physicians compared to the general us working population. While interventions have been developed to address factors that contribute to burnout among practicing physicians, there is a strong need to focus on prevention for all clinicians involved in the delivery of healthcare services. This presentation will provide information about burnout statistics, factors that contribute to it, and ways it can be prevented. Pathways to developing a work-life balance and promoting self-wellness will also be reviewed, as will a novel resident and fellow wellness program developed at Stanford University.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-033-L01-P
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.00
  • Medical & Recreational Cannabis, What’s a Clinician to Do?

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is now recognized as an important modulator of many physiological processes. Even more recently, an increasing body of evidence has been accumulated to suggest the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and antinociceptive roles of the ECS. In 1997, the Office of National Drug Control Policy commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to conduct a comprehensive study of the medical efficacy of cannabis therapeutics. The IOM concluded that cannabis is a safe and effective medicine, patients should have access, and the government should expand avenues for research and drug development. This course will discuss cannabis as it relates to effective pain management.

    • UAN: 0530-0000-19-034-L01-
    • AANP Rx Hours: 0.60

SPONSORED PROGRAMS

To accompany and enrich your experience at the PAINWeekEnd conference, be sure to attend one or more of the sponsored programs, which are scheduled during breakfast, lunch, and afternoon "Brain Food" time slots in the schedule. There is NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE to attend these program sessions!